Latest Posts



Harlem's Cam'ron has released a new track titled "D.IA.". The track has old pro wrestler Rick Flair giving one of his classic boasting rants at the start. Cam spits that Harlem hustle that we all know him for. His boastful street rhymes are the perfect touch for the triumphant horns and snapping drums, produced by J.B. Music Group.



Written by DJ Sub-T

Also contributing to Hip Hop Authority www.hiphopauth.com


With an abundance of headlines swirling around about the unfortunate passing of the solidified hip-hop vet, Prodigy, I began thinking about why he grew to be one of my favorites. Aside from the anthem-like classics he is recognized for as a part of Mobb Deep, or the unforgettable beefs he was involved in with people like Jay-Z or Crooked I, there was something about P that made him different. It seemed no matter where his career took him, he would die before he forgot his adversely vicious upbringing. He was a true New Yorker through and through, and it was heard with clarity every time he breathed on a mic. I had the pleasure of meeting Prodigy a couple years back after a show. There was no doubt in my mind that he hung around to speak with fans because it was what he felt the need to do, not his manager or anybody else.

So, without further ado, here are my top 5 verses from the Queens legend (in no order).

Prodigy & Alchemist - Give Em Hell (2013)



"I am – slippery when wet off that ‘maldehyde/
Smoke a Dutch full of dust, pull a homo"

I always felt P adapted to the challenge of aging quite well. His voice grew heavy and pronounced, and his stayed true to his grime. This imagery of getting high on PCP and committing a homicide will testify.

Big Pun - Tres Leches Ft. Inspectah Deck & Prodigy (1998)




"Give you a red shirt with the wet hat to match/
First max like it's Hamburger Hill for real"


 One of the best New York cuts ever, Prodigy getting it done on the late Big Pun's classic Capital Punishment. P really just dances all over this RZA instrumental and paints a picture, the visuals become branded in your head. 

Mac Miller - Confessions of a Cash Register Ft. Prodigy (2013)




"There's too much dough out here to be broke"

Like I said before, there's something about the later days of P that catches my ear and resonates so well. Also, in case you can't tell, I am really fond of the chemistry he had with his good friend Alchemist who supplied this instrumental.

Mobb Deep - Hell On Earth (1996)


"Test me, you must be bent, G, don't tempt me/I had this full clip for so long, it needs to empty" 


This track, being the title track from Mobb Deep's 1996 LP, serves as one of the staple records for fans of the duo. The beat has their name written all over it, and Prodigy sandwiches a tight verse from Havoc with two gems of his own. That's where this decision got tough. Prodigy truly bodied each of those verses, although I think I would have been criticized if I didn't choose the latter.

Prodigy - Three Ft. Cormega (2000)




"F**k a cab lets take cracked out Yolanda's Saab/
We gave that bitch two wibbles"

Coming from my personal favorite Prodigy project (Mobb Deep or solo), Prodigy rolls along this head-banger of a beat utilizing that imagery I think so highly of. He tells a story so well you almost forget that he's rhyming to a brilliant scheme. That's what P did so well- come off as effortless.

Rest in Power to Prodigy, a real stand-up guy.


Earlier this year I was fortunate enough to come across upstate NY MC "Big Mike" and his music. I reviewed his album "State of Mind" because I was blown away by it. Mike is set to be featured on my upcoming third dj mixtape "404 Not Found", which drops this Friday, June 23rd. I'm even more fortunate now to be able to bring the OK-Tho! community a pretty chill but in-depth interview with the young up and coming talent!


What kind of space were you in when creating "State of Mind"?


- When I created the album I was motivated like never before. I had just recently got a sponsorship and I was finally getting the opportunity to record in a professional studio.


How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist/person, or album? How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?


- Growing up I battled with a lot of depression and anxiety. I went through months of counseling and about ten different medications just to find out that music was the only way to make myself feel sane. At my lowest, I was introduced to a artist that goes by the name of Logic. He's inspired me in ways that I can't explain and I don't think I would still be here without the positive message he portrays in his music!


Do you feel there's still a color barrier in Hip-Hop? If you heard them, how do you feel about Lord Jamar's white rappers comments from a few years back?


- Growing up in a small town in Upstate NY and going to a school in which 95% of people are white, I believe that there is still a color barrier in today's Hip-Hop. I was hated on constantly for being different, but I stuck with it and look where we are today. As far as Lord Jamar's comment, I could care less. Everybody is entitled to their own opinion. Either way I'm going to continue to work as hard as I can and block out all the hate and negativity.


You and I have talked about our tastes in music before, how do you feel about how alive the blending of different sounds in Hip-Hop is? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. And do you feel "mumble rap" should have its own category like trap and other sub-genres do? Should it even be called Hip-Hop, or should it be thrown into the mainstream "rap" category?


- I grew up on a mixture of Ozzie and a lot of classic rock. Even though I make specifically rap music, I'm a HUGE fan of all genres! I don't really have much to say about trap and mumble rap because that's not style of music I'm educated on. I love to listen to music I can relate to and get inspired by.


How do you feel about the current state of Hip-Hop? Do you feel there's a fair mesh of underground and mainstream?


- I believe in today's music, we're making the wrong people famous.



How's the Hip-Hop scene in your city? Is there one besides you?


- The Hip-Hop scene in my city is decent. There are only a handful of artists that I feel can compete at a high level, but I respect everybody who is on their grind.



What can we expect in the future as far as projects? Solo album, collab album, features? If anything, would they be released in 2017?


- I'm currently working on two HUGE projects. I'm not going to speak on the release date or the features, but I encourage you all to not sleep on me. Be ready.


Great. Thank you for taking the time converse bro. Anything you want to say or anybody you want to shout out?


- I want to give a huge shoutout to the loyal fans for supporting me through thick and thin. And anybody still hating on me, fuck you.


I like the attitude. That's what it is, we're out.









Peace and love to the OK-Tho! Community. Today I have the pleasure of bringing you all an interview with a man who's been a homie of mine for well over a year now, the producer emcee himself out of Orlando Florida, Ricky Atoms. I featured Ricky on my spring/summer 2016 mixtape "As We Thrive" and on my fall 2016 EP "XtENsiON(EP)". Enjoy reading our discussion on his thoughts on the current state of Hip-Hop, Hip-Hop in his city, his introduction to the culture, his influences, the Lo-Fi sound, and more!


How's the Hip-Hop scene in your city?

  Ricky: Well right now, I see a lot of more lyrical cats coming out of nowhere. But it's a lot like other places where that trap-punk type wave is going on.


What was your introduction to Hip-Hop? Any particular album/song, person or artist?

Ricky: I was pretty much under a rock in my own world when it came to music until an old friend of mine named Travis started letting me hold his ipod in high school and put me on to Talib Kweli, Mos Def, Jean Grae and various other artists.


How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

Ricky: Well, as far as my foot being in the door I don't feel I'm quite there per say but I'm definitely on track to becoming the artist I want to be.


Who are your favorite producers out right now? Do you feel any of them have an influence on your sound?

Ricky: Dilla, Black Milk, Karriem Riggins, MF DOOM, MADLIB, 9thWonder. Yes, I feel all of them have influenced me in some form or fashion. I ask myself what would they do to this sample or how they would layer drums, etc. I try to apply a little of my influences styles into my own little beat gumbo lol.


How do you feel about how alive the blending of different sounds is in Hip-Hop? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. It could all fall under the sub-genres of industrial, experimental, alternative, etc.

Ricky: Not much to say about it to be honest. I understand that it is part of the growth of the culture to take from anywhere and make it "Hip-Hop". We have been doing that for as long as hip-hop has been around, but how it's done could determine how to categorize what you do with what you have I guess.


You told me a while back that you started making Lo-Fi before it was a thing. Why did you stop? Do you feel you'd be even more progressed in your career if you had stuck with it? And how do you feel about how where it is now and how it fits in the Hip-Hop scene?

Ricky: To be honest it's very crazy to think I was doing those type of beats and when I stopped a whole wave of producers popped from a style I had already stop doing. I mean I was getting thousands of plays from those beats, but at the time I was making those I wasn't thinking make lo-fi beats. I was trying to figure out how to do it like Hi-Tek, 9th Wonder and Dilla. I wanted to achieve a cleaner sound. I mean I was on soundcloud before it blew up. I guess that's how I got so much love around that time.

I think if I stayed with the lo-fi sound there is no telling where I would be in that realm of hip-hop, but I know I would be a complete monster with the lo-fi skills lol. But It's pretty dope that lo-fi beats are a thing now. I'm cool with it, it's some crazy talent in the Lo-fi realm nowadays. Like these producers are nasty with it and I just be like "that go so hard" and I bump them joints lol.


How do you feel about the current state of Hip-Hop? Is there a fair mesh of underground and mainstream?

Ricky: To be honest I feel like there is not a fair balance in Hip Hop, The radio is too saturated with microwave music, like come on y'all we need some type of substance. But I understand it's more of a business then the art itself and in with us living in times where we need instant gratification, Hot Pockets sell. Hell even I like hot pockets, though that's not my primary eating choice. Feel me?


Do you feel mumble rap should have its own sub-genre label like trap and others do? Should it even be called Hip-Hop, or should it be thrown into the mainstream "rap" category?

Ricky: OH MAN! I swear I think about this question all the time. I think mumble rap should just be labeled as "Mumble Rap" or something else. Definitely a sub genre of Rap and not leaned so much on the label "Hip-Hop" because KRS-ONE said Hip is the knowledge and Hop is the movement. And even that small quote is a testament to what Hip Hop is in its truest form.


What can we expect in the future as far as music? Solo album, collab album, collab feature? If anything, would it be released in 2017?

Ricky: As for future projects, I have something I'm quietly putting together. As far as collabs, there aren't many artist that are coming up that wants to collab. Be it ego or just not wanting others to outshine them. I don't know but I don't get responses from who I reach out to for now. So I'm just working on my music in my sector of the world lol.


Great. Thank you for taking the time to converse brother. Anything you want to say or anybody you want to shout out?

Ricky:  I want to thank you for the opportunity to do this interview with you man, You're cool people and, I want to shout out my crew and family. Peace Love and Prosperity. Stay Up Yo!


There it is. Peace, and on that note, we're out.





Florida's Wifisfuneral maintains the busy workload he's been flexing of late, significantly since his moshing incident that took place recently. Almost undoubtedly in spirit of the Joe Budden and Lil Yachty debate that caught some serious buzz, Wifisfuneral gives the track an exaggerated, comical title (emoticon frowny face and all). He even takes an approach to the track, spanning from beat selection, to the subject matter, to the delivery, that seems to be more catered to the likes of a Joe Budden than we've seen from much of his catalogue. He has the flexibility that allows for a wide range of sounds, including xanned out and trappy to well calculated and structured. This one falls more towards the latter, probably not coincidentally.





Peace to the OK-Tho! community. Today I bring you an interview with PA MC "A. Rob". A. Rob is set to be featured on my upcoming mixtape "404 Not Found" which drops on Friday, June 23rd.
A.Rob (@ARobsMusic) Soundcloud.com/ameen-rahman



How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist? Any particular artist, album, song or person?


Cassidy really got my mental gears turning. I was probably twelve or thirteen years old when I really became infatuated with the way rhymes, similes and metaphors could all gather up for an impressive punch line. That's how I learned how to rap. It was the punch line bar for bar style for me until I hard "The Cool" by Lupe Fiasco. That changed everything. I started mixing what I got from Cassidy with the intelligent consciousness and storytelling of Lupe, and that was that. To this day those are my two biggest influences.


How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

I think I'm still kind of knocking on the door. Sometimes it cracks open and someone important peeks out and gives me a, "good work" or, "keep it up". A couple more times of that happening and I'll really have my foot in the door. Networking, meeting new people and spreading the word about my music has led me to good opportunities, and I know with consistency the opportunities will continue to grow and so will I as an artist.


What kind of MC are you?

I am a Palestinian-American, Lyrical, conscious, but still fun MC. I can have a crowd in tears or jumping up and down. I can give you your favorite part song and favorite conscious song on the same project. I'm really every kind of MC mixed into one.


Who are your favorite artists out right now? Do you feel any of them influence your sound?

My favorite Rappers out right now are "Chance The Rapper", "Noname", "Mick Jenkins" and "Smino". They have all influenced my sound for sure. I also listen to a lot of other genres. I love alternative rock. "Twenty One Pilots", "Catfish and the Bottlemen" and "OK GO" have influenced my style just as much as any Hip Hop artist.

How's the Hip-Hop scene in your city?

I'm from Harrisburg, PA. A small city with a quiet Hip Hop scene. Most people who rap from my city are on the same shit. Hood music, talking about the same damn thing as everyone else, with similar flow and beat choice. It doesn't excite me. As far as producers though, there are a few guys I really like from my area and will be working with diligently. I recently moved to Philly to try to escape the Harrisburg scene actually. Out here there are a million different genres blended into the Hip Hop scenes core. I've already met more dope artists than I know in my hometown, and I guess that speaks for itself.


How do you feel about the current state of Hip-Hop? Is there a fair mesh of underground and mainstream?

Hip-Hop is so over-saturated with the same type of music. It's heavily off balance and unevenly meshed. Plain and simple, I think true lyricists and storytellers need to overthrow all the nonsense and restore the balance.

Do you feel "mumble rap" should have its own category like trap and other sub-genres do?

"Mumble Rap", if we want to call it that, should definitely have it's own category. It just doesn't really fit with the idea of Hip Hop, which is all based off of words and lyrics. Whenever I ask someone what they like about a certain "Mumble Rap" song, the answer always revolves around two things, the melody and the beat. There was a time, as J Cole once said, "back when you could get a platinum plaque without no melody". I think those times are completely gone forever so I get it. People are adjusting to the times with the melodic beats and vocals that stick, I totally understand. I just personally don't like it because I'm a fan of lyricism, so would I want my music to be in the same category as Mumble Rap, no.

How do you feel about how alive the blending of different sounds in Hip-Hop is? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. It could all fall under the alternative, experimental, and industrial labels.

I love the blending of genres into Hip Hop. It makes it so much more interesting. It's not ruining a thing, just enhancing and helping things grow. All of the Alternative Rock, EDM, Dancehall, R&B, Funk or any other genre I may listen to will do nothing but help Hip Hop grow and progress.

Do you have friends and family that support what you do?

My family and friends definitely support what I do, but from a distance, unfortunately none of them are hands on in helping me achieve my musical goals. My mom wants me to use my degree, and my Dad just assumes he knows things about the music industry and so he gives me outlandish advice. Some of my friends play my music a lot, some don't know I released a new song until I personally tell them. Either way, I still appreciate the support they all give me.

Do you feel there's still a color barrier in Hip-Hop? How do you feel about Lord Jamar's white rappers comments from a few years back?


I honestly never heard of Lord Jamar until right now. Glad I looked it up though, he's got some intelligent points. I do think it's important to know the true originators and legends of Hip Hop and where it all came from. And yes, the true originators were all black. Moving forward though I think no matter what your ethnicity, If you respect the culture and make dope music it should stand for itself and there should be nothing wrong with idolizing white, or any other raced rappers.  There will always be a color barrier in Hip Hop just as there will be everywhere else, but I believe talent and passion should be looked at first.


What can we expect in the future as far music? Solo album, collab, feature? If anything, would they be released in 2017?

So much good music will be coming from me in 2017. I already released 3 singles on all major platforms, "#Goals", "Reporting Live" and " U Got Me" (Search A.Rob) The singles will keep piling in and will be followed up by a 6 track EP by a young producer from Harrisburg and me. It's a super dope project with totally different feels for each track. This will be followed by another EP which is a collaboration by a Producer/Singer from West Chester and me. Both projects will be available on all major streaming platforms. I am definitely hype to get these out, everyone's going to love it.






I've been a regular viewer of Dead End Hip-Hop for a little over two years now. In that time, I've become familiar with just who the hell Damone Tyrell is. I've reviewed his newest album back in 2016 "Who the Hell is Damone Tyrell" on my YouTube, and featured him on my #XtENsiON(EP) back in October of 2016. Now I've gotten to know the young talent out of Buffalo, NY a little better in our first interview together.


How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist, person or album pave the way?

My mom, she always had music playing when we would ride from ATL to Buffalo. She had to keep herself awake since she was driving for 12 hours straight. She'd play artists like "ATCQ, Nas, Jay-Z," just to name a few. She'd still play soundtracks from my favorite movies from time to time also just to provide a balance, as well as R&B and Soul music. I have to say out of everyone she played I gravitated toward ATCQ the most, it wasn't until later in my childhood that I discovered Biggies Life After Death album and immediately wanted to rap from that moment on.


How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

I still haven't. "making it" or "getting your foot in the door" is very subjective, based on my accomplishments I still feel very unfulfilled when it comes to my career. Now with that said, I do appreciate said accomplishments as they come and I'd like to believe that my passion, hunger and focus help put me in a position to achieve.


What kind of space were you in mentally/musically when you were in the creation of "Who the Hell is Damone Tyrell?"

I was all over the place. I recorded "Catch 23" in January of 2016 when I was working at this bogus security job, and the other songs came shortly after the idea of the tape was confirmed. I was all but relaxed with the making of that EP, but crazy enough it feels like one big exhale when you listen to it.


How do you feel about the current state of Hip-Hop? Is there a fair mesh of underground and mainstream?

I feel like Hip-Hop is growing, it's not the 90's anymore, rappers no longer have to stick to a specific formula or what have you. The difference between the underground and mainstream to me is budget, and even then some underground rappers can compete with mainstream artists still.


Do you feel "mumble rap" should have its own like trap and other sub-genres do? Should it even be called Hip-Hop, or should it be thrown in the mainstream "Rap" category.

I don't fuck with separation in Hip-Hop. If it's derivative of the art form then it should be under the same umbrella regardless of the content. Punk Rock is still Rock music, just for a specific crowd of fans. So mumble rap should still considered under that umbrella in my opinion. I also think mainstream rap and underground hip-hop are dumb ways to continue separation in hip hop.


How'd you get involved with DEHH?

Funny story I entered the Bar Exam back in October 2015, an open mic night at Apache cafe in ATL, and was excited to see DEHH judging. I had always been a fan and wanted a review so it made sense to show up and try an impress, little did I know I would go on to win and later next year (2016) be dubbed their official artist. We released WTHIDT in September and did various interviews/shows, I definitely have more to come with the good folks of DEHH so stay tuned.


What can we expect in the future as far as music? Solo album, collab album, feature? If anything, would they be released in 2017?

I actually have a collaborative mixtape dropping with my homie "BangersByOne" a producer out of Indiana that's crushing the scene right now. Its called 5 Stories and will be released 7/7/17, attached with a short film. I most definitely excited for people to hear this project, it took me 3 days to finish so it was more of a challenge, but came together almost flawlessly.


Great. Thank you for taking the time to converse brother. Anything you want to say or anybody you want to shout out?

DEHH, that's about it. 








I came across California based MC 'Whidbee' a year and a half ago after hearing his music played by the Legendary STAR (Troi Torain) on his evening radio show "Live and Direct" on YouTube. In that time I've chopped and screwed some of his music and even featured on my first mixtape "#WePutOurSELFOn" back in December of 2015. Now I've had the pleasure of getting to know him a little better by conversing with him on numerous subjects from his introduction to Hip-Hop, how he got started and progressed to where he is now, future music, and more! Read our one-on-one below and enjoy,

1.) How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist or person? Any particular album?

I actually got started in Hip Hop following my brother, he used to record his music and I would freestyle. One day he took me to the studio and told me to spit a verse to one of his songs, however I did not take the opportunity serious. I thought I could just freestyle my way through the song, biggest mistake I learned when recording music.


2.) How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

I actually got my foot in the door freestyling over other artist beats, once I gain a fan base I started putting out original music.


3.) How do you feel about how alive the blending of different sounds in Hip-Hop is? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. It could all fall under the sub-genres of experimental, alternative, industrial, etc. And you do you feel 'mumble rap' should have it's own category as a sub-genre of Hip-Hop like trap and other styles do. Should it even be called Hip-Hop, or should in be thrown in the mainstream "Rap" category?

In my opinion, blending music takes away from what Hip Hop is. If you're going to create a new genre of music, call it something else. Don't water down the original product to get a cheaper substitute. R&B is basically dead ever since the singers wanted to become rappers and rappers started singing. If a rapper starts to play instruments then that is totally different from just programming a beat digitally. That since of pride comes into play because you are on an entire different level from the other rappers.

Mumble rap and Trap music are just names people gave to a certain sound. If you look back, there were artist you couldn't understand and other artist who talked about the hood and selling drugs, no difference.  The difference between mumble rap and rap is you couldn't understand is the simple fact that back then you would print out lyrics and learn them, and be astonished by what this artist said. Now people are lost in the beat so mumble rappers get a way with a lot of nonsense.


4.) How's the Hip-Hop scene in your city? 

In California the Hip Hop scene is striving up north in LA and Oakland, however in San Diego it's not too much. If you want to make it out in San Diego you have to branch outside the city.


5.) Who are your favorite artists out? Do you feel any of them influence your sound? 

My favorite artists out right now are DMX, Cam'ron, Jay Z, Kanye, Dave East, T.I.P, Jeezy, and Nipsey Hussle. I would say if you listen closely to my music you can find some similarities.


6.) What kind of MC would you say you are?

I have been considered a conscious street rapper that can mash well with pop and edm music.

7.) How do you feel about the current state of Hip-Hop? Is there a fair mesh of underground and mainstream? 

The current state of music is currently in a transition period in my opinion. Lyrics are starting to matter once again which is really important in the world of Hip Hop. The current state allows people to live lies. What I mean by this is, what happened to the struggle we call life? Why is it that the entire world is partying? What, nobody has problems anymore? A lot of what rappers talk about is doing drugs, sex, and designer stuff. In this era and it's accepted.

The current state of music is also unfair in the sense that you have to have a gimmick to make it, however this gives independent underground rappers a chance to learn the game digitally and figure things out while waiting for a door to open up.

8.) What can we expect in the future as far as projects? Any collabs, solo projects, features? Would they be released in 2017?

I just dropped "Coo World" which is available on all music platforms, I will be releasing a new mixtape this fall and another one in the winter. I've also published my first book titled By my lonely available at all major book retailers.


Well thank you Sir. After knowing you and working with you for a while now, it was good to add this to our list of accomplishments together. Anything you want to say, or anybody you want to shout out?

First, thank you for having me on your platform and respect. I want to speak to the independent artist out there that might feel like the ups and downs that comes with this game might feel like a waste of time. Remember this is a business and in business its about endurance and profit. You need to be able to keep going when you feel like quitting, eventually the profit will come in due time if people believe in you. So, keep working, perfect your craft, learn from every mistake and never doubt yourself.



Don Show is Dallas based rapper who is very closely associated with his fellow Dallas based rapper, Griff. I recently interviewed Griff as well. Both artists are set to be featured on my newest mixtape "404 Not Found" which drops on Friday, June 23rd.


How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist, person or album?

- I first got into hip hop when I was younger. My favorite rapper was Ludacris initially, but whenever Lil Wayne got hot I was definitely on that bandwagon. I want to say it was this random deejay mixtape called Mister Carter 2. From that point I was a Waynehead.


How'd you get foot in the door as an artist?

 - I just know a few people who are in that world. They don't work a 9-5. They live the life that is ideal for a person like me. Like I grew up with these guys. They aren't new people I met. We've known each other for years.


Who are your favorite artists out right now? Do you feel any of them influence your sound?

- Right now I've been listening to regular stuff. Kendrick. Drake. I fuck with Isaiah Rashad and more of the young mainstream guys, like Joey Bada$$. I like Yachty. Migos fasho. I just like to know what makes a good radio song and how I can incorporate that into what The Don Show is trying to do. Not necessarily an influence per-say


What kind of MC would you say you are?

- I feel like I haven't truly identified what type of MC I am. I like to make all types of music and venture into various sounds. So to label myself into one category is something I feel like I'll be able to do with more experience and more growth in my craft. Identifying my lane. I'm still learning.

I love Houston Hip-Hop. With you being from Texas, Dallas primarily of course, does DJ Screw, Scarface and the Geto Boys, UGK from Port Arthur, ABN, and the rest of the primarily Houston Hip-Hop scene influence you?

 - Of course it does. I like slower music because that's what was popular. ABN and UGK. I love Houston rap. I was born there. Lived there most of my adult life. So that culture most definitely has an influence on me.

What can we expect in the future as far as music? Solo album, collab album, features? If anything, would they be released in 2017?

- Um, I'm working on an EP right now. It's called "Boy Meets World Expansion Pack" Free Game Everythang. I got work with Griff of course. That's my brother. D-Tae in Florida with it. We working. It's some cats here in Dallas I've been talking to. And recently I started with a new engineer who has experience so things are good. And yes that EP will available this year.

Bet. Anything else you want to say or anybody you want to shout out before close out?


Just free Game everything. We working. Fuck a "like". A repost is what's needed.


Already. That's what it is bro.








With the beat fading in like your lover wearing satin, Clyde Black follows closely behind on the track Novacain Numb Sometimes. Clyde, a member of Boston based collective Dienue Music, brings a pleasant, mellow exterior that needs a second look; allowing us to then see nuances in Clyde’s thoughts and how observant they are. Personally, this track brings about heavy reminiscing to a past not so far away and a longing that old Adult Swim bumps used to foster.









What up OK-Tho! community? Today I'm bringing you an interview with Dallas based rapper Griff. Griff is set to be featured on my newest mixtape "404 Not Found" which drops Friday, June 23rd.


How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist or person? Particular album?

 - The 8mile soundtrack was the first rap CD I got to listen to with curse words. Late registration was the second, after hearing "drive slow" and "roses" I knew I loved this rap shit.


How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

If there is a "door", my foot ain't in it. I'm still in line paying my dues.


Who are your favorite artists out right now? Do you feel any of them influence your sound?

My 3 favorite artists who I could listen to forever are Chance, J. Cole, and Andre 3k. With that being said, YFN Lucci and NBA Youngboy are both in my rotation heavy right now. Everything I listen to effects my style and sound as an artist. From the Sade my mama used to play when I was little, to the lil dicky tracks my roommate used to show me just to get a laugh.


What kind of MC would you say you are?

- I don't know what type of artist I am yet. I just want to give people music they can feel. Something that brings emotion.

I love Houston Hip-Hop. With you being from Texas, are UGK, DJ Screw, Scarface and the Geto Boys, SUC, Swishahouse, Street Military, ABN, BHO, Guerilla Maab, and the rest of the Houston scene an influence on you?

 - As far as Houston rap I got hella love and respect for it, but as a Dallas nigga I got a chip on my shoulder. Texas rap ain't just Houston. There is a gold mine of talent in this area, Dallas coming hard in 2017.


What can we expect in the future as far as projects? Solo album? Collab album? Features? If anything, would they be released in 2017?

- in 2017 I will be dropping another solo project titled 'Never Fold' as well as a joint tape with my brother D-Tae called 'Keep Yo Head Up'. Also, a handful of videos will be releasing from multiple artist.

Great. Thanks for taking the time to converse brother. Anything else you want to say or anybody you want to shout out before we close?

- Thank you bro, you doing a great thing for up and coming artist. $tan RIP KREEPA, Aggtown Southside Stand Up!!



I was fortunate enough to be introduced to Uspire in the later half of 2016 through OK-Tho! itself. Since then, I've reviewed his "Shadows in the night" album and featured on my later EP. I'm now fortunate enough to interview the aspiring MC.

1.      What kind of space were you in when you in the process of your last project "shadows in the night"?

I was in a very good creative space during the actual writing and recording phase of Shadows In The Night. The concept for the overall project, topics/themes for each individual song, structuring of the tracklist, everything just seemed to come to me very naturally during that 5-6 month stretch. Outside of the music, mentally, physically, and spiritually, I was feeling the best I had in years. For about 2-3 years prior to creating that project, I was in a much darker place, dealing with my own personal battles as well as those of my close friends and family. I appreciate that time period though because it probably laid the foundation for the project I eventually ended up creating.

2.      How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist/person? Particular album?

I didn’t really buy CDs much as a kid, so most of my music intake was from watching shows like Yo! MTV Raps and Rap City. I remember sitting in front of the TV, waiting to go to the bathroom because I didn’t want to miss my favorite song out at that time. Now, we can just pull up YouTube and watch any music video we want, but I feel like having to patiently wait for them to play your favorite video back then made it all the more special. Once I actually got my hands on physical CDs a few years later, some of the albums that really had an impact on me were: Doe Or Die (AZ), Illadelph Halflife (The Roots), and The Miseducation of Lauryn Hill.

3.      How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

I first started writing rhymes back in high school just as a way to pass time in class. Once I got to college, my writing naturally improved, and I started to take it a little more seriously. I would perform at some open mic events and talent shows on campus. In my senior year, I linked up with a friend and put out a concept project entitled The Blind Voice. People who knew me seemed to enjoy it and a few blogs even posted it, which was definitely a cool feeling. I went a few years without releasing any material before I finally put out my first solo project, Shadows In The Night, which received even more attention from blogs and independent radio stations. A person who I’ve never met before said that it was my project that made them like hip hop music. I’ve also received a few messages from people telling me how much a particular song helped them through a difficult point in life. I never expect to hear those things, but having that impact on even one person is significant to me.

4.      Do you have family/friends who support what you do?

I do. I’m very blessed to have a loving, very supportive family and group of friends.

5.      How do you feel about the newer talent coming out of Chicago right now? Like Chance, Saba, Odd Couple, Vic Mensa, Mick Jenkins, Montana of 300, Noname, etc.?

These guys are doing some great things. Just listening to the music, you can tell they’re actually taking the time to formulate ideas and craft verses. I appreciate anyone who puts real thought and time into whatever it is they are creating.

6.      Being from Chicago I have to ask you this, With Kanye, Common, Da Brat, Do or Die, Twista, Lupe, Rhymefest, No ID, and etc. being from the area, what to you is Chicago's place is in Hip-Hop?

Just in the names you listed, you can see the amount of diversity when it comes to different sounds and styles. Geographically, I suppose it makes sense. You look at the largest metropolitan cities across the country such as New York, LA, Chicago, Dallas, Houston, DC, Philly, Miami, Atlanta. Every one of those cities with the exception of Chicago is either in the East, West, or South where the sounds may be a little more defined. Regardless of what is playing on the mainstream level, there is a
great deal of diversity in Chicago hip hop music, and really, art in general. It’s definitely a creative place.

7.      What can we expect in the future as far projects? Solo album, collab, if anything, would they be released in 2017?

I have a few loose project ideas I’m working on simultaneously, but not sure which one I will ultimately move forward with next. I tend to operate outside the construct of time when it comes to making music, which may be why my releases aren’t as frequent as other artists. I like to do research, allow life to happen, and gain new experiences that eventually lead to inspiration for a strong, conceptual project. I wouldn’t be satisfied putting out a disjointed project, but I may put out a few isolated tracks this year to help bridge that gap.

8.      Do you feel there's still a color barrier in Hip-Hop? (If you heard them) How do you feel about Lord Jamar's white rappers comments from a few years back?

I absolutely agree with Jamar that white rappers are guests in hip hop. When you go back to the 70s, Kool Herc and Coke La Rock provided the basic template for what hip hop shows would grow to become. You had DJs in the early 70s like Pete DJ Jones and Grand Master Flowers who brought the party to the parks in their respective boroughs. Even beyond that, you had people like Gil Scott-Heron, George Clinton, James Brown, even H. Rap Brown who delivered his speeches in a rhythmic, poetic style. All of these people influenced what we know as rap today. It was founded by Black people, but white people were always welcomed as guests.

9.      You and I have talked about our tastes in music before. How do you feel about how a live blending of different sounds in Hip-Hop is? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. It could all fall under the sub-genres of experimental, alternative, industrial, etc. And do you feel 'mumble rap' should have its own category like trap and others do. Should it even be called Hip-Hop, or thrown in the (mainstream) 'Rap' category.

I already feel like “mumble rap” is an unofficial sub-genre. It’s not something I listen to, so I couldn’t even tell you if the people that make that kind of music have another name for it. The only time I’m bothered by this is when people outside of the hip hop community listen to “mumble rap” and assume that every rapper or hip hop artist is exactly like that. The issue is the lack of variety in the mainstream more than anything. Back in the day, you could have Kid ‘N Play, Public Enemy, A Tribe Called Quest, and LL Cool J all on the radio at the same time. People within the hip hop community know that there’s a huge difference in styles between Lil Yachty and Black Thought.

10.  Any advice to aspiring artists? And for that how'd you get your foot in the door question, do you live off your music?

I’m currently unable to live off my music and have to work a regular job, so I can’t really offer the greatest advice in that regard. As general advice though, I would say to just stay true to yourself. It’s very easy to compare yourself to other people, especially those in the same field you work or perform in, but your path is not going to look the same as the person you’re trying to imitate or follow. Everyone is going to have their own struggles, successes, and unique undulations along the way. There’s no person in the world that can be a better version of you than yourself. Embrace your uniqueness, perfect your own style, and become the best version of yourself possible. That’s with anything, not just music.

Great. Thank you for taking the time to do converse brother. Anything you want to say or anybody you want to shout out?

I just want to give a big thank you to everyone​ who has taken the time to listen to Shadows In The Night. I want to give a special shout out to Add-2, Domi, Sohjé, Albert, and James who all helped make this project possible. Finally, I want fans to realize just how important they are to me and unsigned artists in general. I don't have a label or marketing team behind me, so whenever somebody shares my music with another person, it truly does help. I think there's great power in word of mouth and grassroots movements. No voice is too small to make a difference. For those interested, you can stream/download my project at the following link:

https://uspire.bandcamp.com/album/shadows-in-the-night






I have known and worked with the Lebanon PA artist Zen Gnarly for almost two and a half years now. Now we've taken the time to converse and speak on his upcoming album, the current state of Hip-Hop, his alias, and more.


1.) So you got a new album dropping, what kind of space were you in creating this? Can we expect anything completely left from what you've done in the past?

- Heartbreaks, Mental Breakdowns, suicidal thoughts, struggles with artistic expression, Hallucinations, Depersonalizations, Delusions, Questioning existence & God, Loneliness, The Future, Robots, Portals, Parallel realities, Prophesies, Changes, voices, sacrifice.

The mindset or creative space I was in is a recovery from my very first psychosis. This album isn't entirely different, just a bit more in depth of who I am. Each track on the album describes you or paints a picture of what it's like living being schizoaffective so things are very distorted and far fetched.


2.) How'd you get into Hip-Hop? Any particular artist/person? Particular album?

- I was very much interested into Hip-Hop at a very young age . I grew up listening to Jay-Z I also was exposed to the earliest age when every song had that "DJ Clue" or "Desert Storm" DJ tag in their music.


3.) How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

- George Bait who was my mentor at a time brought me out to Maryland where I was given a taste of a different market of artists and also services to advance myself as an artist. It was there where I first shot my very first music video "Wssup" Since then I've been locking in with different people expanding my sound.

4.) How do you feel about how alive blending of different sounds in Hip-Hop is? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. It could all fall under the sub-genres of experimental, alternative, industrial, etc. And do you feel 'mumble rap' should have it's own category like trap and others do. Should it even be called Hip-Hop, or thrown in the (mainstream) 'Rap' category?

- I feel like what we're witnessing in Hip-Hop is another Big Bang, a form of many evolutions merging different sounds to create different sounds and genres. We look at rock as something separate from hip hop but it's been existing here with us for a long time. As far as mumble rap, I don't think it should have its own genre nor should we call it just that I think we should embrace it as Hip-Hop. When I hear Uzi or Carti blatantly shouting in their Adlibs it reminds me of James Brown .


5.) How's the Hip-Hop scene in your city? Is there one at all besides you?

- I'm unaware of The Hip-Hop scene in Lebanon PA . I know there's a few other artists that I like very much such as First Class Waves and Markush that are making their own noise but as far as the others I don't really go out of my way to look for them.

6.) Who are your favorite artists out? Do you think any of them influence your sound?

 - Favorite artists right now would be Zen Gnarly, Zenny, and Zenny the futurist for right now. I just started listening to music again and without being passive with it but I wouldn't say anyone has any influences over my sound since I've been in a hiatus just creating.

7.) What's Zen Gnarly mean?

- What Zen Gnarly means to me is two different realities merged together one being of peace the other being radical. Yin&Yang

8.) What kind of MC are you?

- I don't consider myself a MC, I'm a futurist, a jack of all trades. But if I was a type of MC I say I would be a wizard type of MC casting spells with words, opening portals.

9.) Do you have family and friends that support what you do? Have you had to let any body go in pursuit of your career?

- A lot of my close homies and musician friends support my music to the max. Some of my family members know what I do but don't really see the big picture yet. I had to let go of relationships and certain flings that weren't healthy and were eventually gonna block my path to success.

10.) What's the new album called?

- My new album is called 333Dimensions


Great. Thank you for taking the time to converse brother. Anything you want to say or anybody you want to shout out?

Eagleville hospital, George Bait, TGDJ, Erik Dom, James Diotic, Markiz Rey, Hustle Firms Studio, Ra Digga. And I wanna say and ask one thing. What the fuck is a smart phone nigga? Oh shout out Shenny, Butch Dawson, Baeside, Hurtboii. Those were the producers behind it.









Through my long-time brother Zen Gnarly and his first mixtape 'Golden', I came across the talented NY producer TGDJ. I've reviewed his two albums of his, "Summer's Over (20$6)" and "[The Color & Sound.]" which are admirable projects. Now I'm bringing some insight on him to the OK-Tho! community to help make more listeners aware of his special talent, and his drive. TGDJ is also gonna be featured on my newest mixtape "404 Not Found" which drops Friday, June 23rd.

1.) Just what got you into Hip-Hop?

-I remember around 8th grade I was at my peak obbsession with acts like the Foo Fighters, Nirvana, Weezer, Queens of the Stone Age, Guns & Roses and the Arctic Monkeys. After I had began to get out of my confort zone musically, I exposed myself to more electronic oriented acts, most specifically Daft Punk. It was around the middle of my Freshman year of high school, I spent alot of my free time on youtube watching music videos (something I still do to this day), one day, I stumble apon the music video for Daft Punk's "Harder Better Faster Stronger". It was at this moment my next accidental obbsesion began. Under the related songs I found a little song called "Stronger" by none other than Kanye West. After hearing how he encorporated Daft Punk's track into his track, along with the irresitible anthemic groove, I was instantly hooked. The next weekend I went to my public library, which allowed you to rent out CD's, and went home with literally every Kanye album up to that date (I think it was up to MBDTF). I then began to obsessivley replay his songs on my IPod nano, just in awe that one person could do so much dope shit. It wasn't utill I got to MBDTF that I really began to appreciate, and just be overwhelmed with how much his music connected with me. Now up to this point, Kanye was the only person in Hip-Hop I was listening to. Being the curious fan I was, I began researching on how MBDTF was created and began to go back in hip hop history, listening to people who influenced Kanye. From there my true door into hip-hop opened, I discovered seminal hip hop acts such as Tribe Called Quest, Wu-Tang, Jay-Z, and eventually the what I consider as a album that helped shape my sound as a producer initially, The Main Ingredient - Pete Rock & CL Smooth.


2.) How'd you get your foot in the door as an artist?

-To be honest it all kind of happened naturally, when I was younger I used to play piano and throughout middle school and the first year of high school I was in concert band, on saxophone. After recognizing that my attitude towards music didn't really mesh well with my band teachers', I left band and began experimenting with music production, and taught myself how to play guitar. One day a group by the name of West Egg popped up in my twitter mentions asking me to give their music video a listen, this was the first time this happened to me, so I figured what the hell. To my surprise I actually really enjoyed their music. One of the artist's from that group, Gats (whos real name is Rob), put out a solo project soon after I discovered the group. Impressed that some random person from Tampa, Florida could rap and produce to this caliber on such a low budget really inspired me to start focusing more on my production. Once I had made a track I thought was cohesive enough to share to the public, I went to Rob seeking critique. The first beat I sent him he wasn't a big fan of, but it was my second, first sampled beat which really caught his ear. I remember not thinking much of it when I sent it to him the beat, which would later land me my first placement on his 2nd project Redtape. From there I linked up with the rest of his crew, James Diotic, Rc, and some more. One of my closer relationships was formed with James Diotic (aka Diego) thru who I eventually was exposed to Zen Gnarly (aka Gio), Erik Dom, and Lance. From then I kept in touch with all of them, growing my network, as well as helping them when I could via production.

3.) Who are your favorite producers out? Do you feel any of them influence your sound? 

-Well if you asked me when I started I'd say Kanye, Pete Rock, and Gats. But over time, Ive been exposed to new music and my music began to reflect that exposure. Along with those previously stated, I've been influenced by people like Q-Tip, 9th Wonder, Dj Shadow, RJD2, Damu The Fudgemunk, Noah Shebib 40, Knxwledge, Toro y Moi, Lapalux, and Iman Omari.

4.) How do you feel about how alive the blending of different sounds in Hip-Hop? From rock/metal infused, R&B infused, pop, etc. It could all fall under of the sub-genres experimental, alternative, industrial, etc.

-I think that all music is inspired but what came before in some fashion, regardless of genre, that being said, I think sub genres are a great way to distinct sounds and their orgins                                                           
5.)  Do you feel "mumble rap" should have its own category like trap and other sub-genres do? Should it even be called Hip-Hop? Or should it be thrown in the "Rap" category?

-Like I said before, all music is inspired but what came before in some fashion, I don't understand why people use the term mumble rap so much, for the most part to me  what people consider mumble rap just seems like a sub genre of the ever expanding trap genre.

6.) How do you feel about the current state of Hip-Hop? Is there a fair mesh of commercial and underground?

-Due to the popularity and accessibility of new music via the internet, there little to nothing that stands in the way of you finding music that best suits your tastes. That being said, yes, there seems to be a good balance of underground and commercial hip-hop music or music in general. In some cases it just takes more digging than others.

7.) Do you feel there is still a color barrier in Hip-Hop? How do you feel about Lord Jamar's white rappers comments from a few years back?

-Well I guess it depends on your perspecitve, there are some notable white rappers who have garnerd succsess in the mainstream, and underground.

8.) What's TGDJ mean?

-When I came up with the name in 8th grade it was an acronym for The Gentleman Disc Jockey, but at this point I've pretty much abandoned the meaning of the acronym and just went with TGDJ, so to answer your question, it can mean what ever you want it to mean.

9.) What kind of space/setting are you in or do you need when in creation mode?

-My ideal physical setting is my laptop, hooked up to my cerwin vega studio monitors, midi keyboard, and a view of the outside world. Mentally I do best after drinking some tea, smoking weed or listening to something which inspires me to create.

10.) What can we expect in the future as far as projects? Solo album, collab album, prod. feature, if anything, would they be released in 2017?

-Well I just put out my first set of remixes under the ep title <d o p e_>, experimenting with a more lo-fi type sound. I have a ep coming in a similar vein but with artist i've colaborated with in the past, and I might do another remix ep before the year's over, if I have enough material I feel comfortable putting out by then. Also s/o to James Diotic (Deigo)...we got something special (if he ever decides to finish his shit).